What was Google’s original name?

What was Google’s original name?

– Gotcha
– Backrub
– Goofball
– Net- Miner

[su_ad]

Backrub

34.4%correct

Google’s co-founders have a knack for goofy yet memorable company names.

[su_ad]

In 1996, before Google existed, Page and Brin thought up quirky names for a search engine and settled on ‘Backrub.’ They settled on this name for the precursor of Google because it was a program that analyzed the ‘back links’ of the web. Using this information, it could determine how important a website was. A year later, they hit on the name ‘Google’ and registered the domain name. The rest is history. Source: BusinessInsider.com

Question: Before Barbara Bush, what First Lady’s husband and son both served as U.S. president?

Before Barbara Bush, what First Lady’s husband and son both served as U.S. president?
– Eleanor Roosevelt
– Dolley Madison
– Abigail Adams
– Eliza McCardle Johnson

[su_ad]

Abigail Adams

Abigail Adams (November 22 [O.S. November 11] 1744 – October 28, 1818) was the closest advisor and wife of John Adams, as well as the mother of John Quincy Adams. She is sometimes considered to have been a Founder of the United States, and is now designated as the first Second Lady and second First Lady of the United States, although these titles were not in use at the time.
[su_ad]

Answer: Abigail Adams was the wife of President John Adams and the mother of John Quincy Adams, who became the sixth president of the United States. Throughout President John Adams’ career, his wife, Abigail Adams, served as an unofficial adviser and their letters show him seeking her counsel on many issues, including his presidential aspirations. Adams remained a supportive spouse and confidante after her husband became the president in 1797, and her eldest son, John Quincy, would become president 7 years after her death in 1825.

Question: How many phone numbers were in the world’s first telephone book?

How many phone numbers were in the world’s first telephone book?

1,945
20,157
391
None

[su_ad]

The Connecticut District Telephone Company issued its phone book just 11 months after its founding. Along with advertisements and business listings in the back of the book, the directory included the names and addresses of its 391 subscribers. There were no phone numbers. The service cost subscribers $22 per year and allowed calls up to three minutes. More than two calls per hour required specific permission from the central office. Source: HistoryofInformation.com

[su_ad]

None

29.9%correct