Whose disciples founded Yellow Hats?

Whose disciples founded Yellow Hats?

Je Tsongkhapa




Zongkapa Lobsang Zhaba,[1] or Tsongkhapa (“The man from Tsongkha”,[2] 1357–1419), usually taken to mean “the Man from Onion Valley”, born in Qinghai,[1] was a famous teacher of Tibetan Buddhism whose activities led to the formation of the Gelug school of Tibetan Buddhism. He is also known by his ordained name Losang Drakpa (Wylie: blo bzang grags pa) or simply as “Je Rinpoche” (Wylie: rje rin po che). He was son of an official of the Yuan Dynasty of China.[1]




In his two main treatises, the Lamrim Chenmo (Wylie: lam rim chen mo) and Ngakrim Chenmo (Wylie: sngags rim chen mo), Tsongkhapa meticulously sets forth this graduated way and how one establishes oneself in the paths of sutra and tantra.




The Yellow Hats are part of The Virtuous School, also called Gelugpa, founded by disciples of Tsongkhapa Lobsang Zhaba (1357–1419). The Dalai Lama, a member of the Gelug school of Buddhism, is an outspoken figure in today’s global culture. The yellow hat name comes from the elaborate headdress worn for ceremonial events, worn to distinguish them from the red-hat-wearing Sakya lamas. They have dominated in Tibet and Mongolia since the end of the 16th century, particularly with the patronage of the Mongols.