Why is there no joy in Mudville, according to Ernest Lawrence Thayer’s poem?

Why is there no joy in Mudville, according to Ernest Lawrence Thayer’s poem?




-The Grinch stole Christmas
-Jack Frost froze the Easter bunny
-Mighty Casey struck out
-The groundhog saw his shadow

Thayer’s ballad commemorating the excitement of baseball became a classic almost immediately.





“Casey At the Bat” humorously captures the tension of America’s highly competitive favorite pastime. It chronicles the game of the “Mudville nine” on one fateful day. Everyone’s hopes of victory ride on a player called “mighty Casey” when he advances to the batter’s box. Arrogantly ignoring the first two pitches (perfect strikes,) Casey swings at last! That’s when the unthinkable happened: “But there is no joy in Mudville – mighty Casey has struck out.” Source: Poets.org




Mighty Casey struck out



“Casey at the Bat: A Ballad of the Republic Sung in the Year 1888” is a baseball poem written in 1888 by Ernest Thayer. First published in The San Francisco Examiner (then called The Daily Examiner) on June 3, 1888, it was later popularized by DeWolf Hopper in many vaudeville performances.